The Three D’s of Horror by Edward Lorn {Guest Post}
by Edward Lorn Also by this author: , , , Bad Apples All good horror is comprised of at least one of the following:... The Three D’s of Horror by Edward Lorn {Guest Post}
by Edward Lorn
Also by this author: , , , Bad Apples

All good horror is comprised of at least one of the following: Dread, Disgust, Death. Sometimes all three are used in a single effort, while other times only one is needed.

Despite all the hate The Blair Witch Project receives within the horror community, the film does have its fans. And, while the film doesn’t show any on-screen deaths or disgusting scenes, the sense of dread is palpable. Dread is also subjective, and can be easily ruined if the viewer isn’t in the right frame of mind. If you went into The Blair Witch Project expecting a thrill ride, you were more than likely disappointed. The film creeps up on you, and even though we can assume no one survived, none of the film’s characters die during the movie’s run time. Their fates are all in our heads.

Disgust is a feeling of revulsion toward things viewed or implied. Torture-Porn films like Saw and Hostel bet all their chips that you’ll find someone taking a blow torch to the face horrifying. But, just like The Blair Witch Project, these films have their detractors. Some horror fans do not believe gore makes a good scary movie. Other horror fans prefer their films bloodier than Carrie at the prom. These fans don’t care whether or not the characters die, only that the cast is maimed and tortured and left swimming in a pool of their own bodily fluids.

Finally, we have those films where the main draw is death, namely slasher films. No one goes to a Friday the 13th movie expecting the cast to survive. Fans of slasher films want the most original death scenes the writers can concoct. Beat a teenager cocooned in a sleeping bag against a tree and you have a happy audience. Shove an arrow through Kevin Bacon’s neck to a sea of applause. Slice a cleaver into the face of a man confined to a wheelchair and you’re welcomed by a cacophony of cheers. These films aren’t shooting for classy cinema. They know their audience, and they bow to the fan’s wishes. Fun times are had by all.

I think the best horror fiction (no matter the media type) uses every one of the three Ds. Check your favorite movies and books and see if you don’t find a perfect balance of dread, disgust, and death. Even if you don’t find all three, you’ll find one or two done exceptionally well. My personal favorite? Dread. It’s also the hardest one to master of the three, and this is because you’re relying on the mindset of the viewer/reader to be susceptible to what you’re selling. The creator can only hope for someone who expects to be creeped out, and then the game is that much easier to win. Even roller-coasters suck if you’re not in the mood, and they’re especially terrible for those that don’t enjoy them at all.

If you like my point of view on the horror genre, why not give one of my books a go? If you’re a fan of slasher films, I suggest my serial novel, CRUELTY.

Thanks for reading,

E.

Check out E’s book on Amazon by clicking on this link.

 

 

About Edward Lorn

Edward Lorn is an American horror author presently residing in the southeast United States. He enjoys storytelling, reading, and writing biographies in the third person.

Once upon a time, during a session of show and tell, a seven-year-old Edward Lorn shared with his class that his baby brother had died over the weekend. His classmates, the teacher included, wept while he recounted the painful tragedy of having lost a sibling. Edward went home that day and found an irate mother waiting for him. Edward’s teacher had called to express her condolences. This was unfortunate, as Edward had never had a baby brother.

With advice given to her by a frustrated teacher, Edward’s mother made him start writing all of his lies down. The rest, as they say, is history.

Edward Lorn and his wife are raising two children, along with a handful of outside cats and a beagle named Dot. He remains a liar to this day. The only difference is, now he’s a useful one.

Nikki

I have an incurable book addiction and I'm not ashamed to admit it. I will buy a book based on its cover alone. I love promoting authors. I am... the Ultimate Reader.

  • E.

    June 8, 2014 #1 Author

    Thanks for having me, Nikki!

    Reply

  • Noah Patterson

    June 8, 2014 #2 Author

    As a fan, critic, and writer of horror myself I couldn’t agree more with this formula. There is a perfect story arc that is captured in these three elements and stories without them are often lacking. Good post.

    Reply

    • E.

      June 8, 2014 #3 Author

      Thank you, Noah. 🙂

      Reply

  • Laurie

    Laurie

    June 9, 2014 #4 Author

    Dread is my favorite too. Disgust and death can grab my attention for the moment but some a slow crawling dread will stick with me.

    Reply

    • E.

      June 9, 2014 #5 Author

      Agreed. 🙂

      Reply

  • Char

    Char

    June 11, 2014 #6 Author

    Dread is also my favorite. I don’t care much for gore, but as a fan of horror, I have to deal with it. But I can think of no bloody scene that tops the feelings that I felt when I read The Haunting of Hill House or any other horror book that is built on atmosphere and dread.

    Reply

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