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{Review} Dark Discoveries-Issue #28

by Brett Talley, Gene O'Neill, Graham Masterton, Harry Shannon, Kevin J. Anderson, Tim Waggoner
Published by JournalStone Genres: Dark Fiction, Fiction, Horror, Supernatural, Thriller

I won this magazine through the Goodreads First Reads giveaway program.

I will admit that I don’t have much experience with the dark fiction/horror magazines of today. When I was younger, I did love mags like Fangoria and Weird Tales, so when I saw this issue was up for a giveaway I immediately entered. I was totally psyched to have won!

This collection was a nice mix of short stories, interviews, features and reviews.

Regarding the short stories, I liked every single one of them. Graham Masterton, Kevin J. Anderson, Gene O’Neill, Harry Shannon, Brett Talley and Tim Waggoner all had contributions here. Kevin Anderson and Gene O’Neill are both completely new to me and since I enjoyed their stories so much I will be seeking out more of their work. Of all of these stories though, I think I enjoyed Tim Waggoner’s story the most. “The Talking Dead” KICKED ASS-wildly imaginative and unapologetic-I loved it!

Of the non fiction portions, which consisted mostly of interviews, I enjoyed the one with Jeffrey Combs the most. (Interviewed mostly because of his roles in various movies like Re-Animator, I enjoyed it and him from his role on Deep Space Nine.) The non fiction section also included some reviews which I also enjoyed, most especially those from Josh Black.

Overall this was an awesome issue that I very much enjoyed.

Recommended to fans of horror short stories!

About Brett Talley

A native of the South, Brett Talley received a philosophy and history
degree from the University of Alabama before moving to witch-haunted
Massachusetts to attend Harvard Law School. When people ask, Brett
tells them he writes for fortune and glory. But the truth is the
stories in his head simply refuse to stay put. Brett loves every kind
of fiction–from horror to literary to historical to sci-fi–as long as
there are fantastic characters with a compelling purpose. There’s
still magic to be found in fiction, the mysterious and the unknown
still beckon there, and the light can always triumph over the
darkness, no matter how black the night may be.

Brett writes when he can, though he spends most of his time working as
a lawyer so that he can put food on the table. That is, until the air
grows cool and crisp and fall descends. For then it is football time
in the South, and Brett lives and dies with the Alabama Crimson Tide.
Roll Tide.

About Graham Masterton

Graham Masterton’s debut as a horror author began with The Manitou in 1976, a chilling tale of a Native American medicine man reborn in the present day to exact his revenge on the white man. It became an instant bestseller and was filmed with Tony Curtis, Susan Strasberg, Burgess Meredith, Michael Ansara, Stella Stevens and Ann Sothern.

Since then Graham has published more than 35 horror novels, including Charnel House, which was awarded a Special Edgar by Mystery Writers of America; Mirror, which was awarded a Silver Medal by West Coast Review of Books; and Family Portrait, an update of Oscar Wilde’s tale, The Picture of Dorian Gray, which was the only non-French winner of the prestigious Prix Julia Verlanger in France.

Three of Graham’s stories were filmed for TV in Tony Scott’s horror series The Hunger, and ‘The Secret Shih-Tan’, starring Jason Scott Lee, was shortlisted for a Bram Stoker Award by the Horror Writers Association. Another short story, ‘Underbed’, about a boy finding a mysterious world underneath his blankets, was voted best short story by Horror Critics Guild.

Graham’s latest horror novels to be published in the United States are Spirit (Leisure, December, 2001); Trauma, (Signet, January, 2002) and The Chosen Child (Tor, January, 2002). Motion picture rights in Trauma have been optioned by Jonathan Mostow, who directed U-571. The Chosen Child, set in the sewers of Warsaw, was named Best Horror Novel of the Year by Science Fiction Chronicle and highly praised in Publisher’s Weekly.

Altogether Graham has written more than a hundred novels ranging from thrillers (The Sweetman Curve, Ikon) to disaster novels (Plague, Famine) to historical sagas (Rich and Maiden Voyage – both appeared in the New York Times bestseller list). He has published four collections of short stories, Fortnight of Fear, Flights of Fear, Faces of Fear and Feelings of Fear.

He has also written horror novels for children (House of Bones, Hair-Raiser) and has just finished the fifth volume in a very popular series for young adults, Rook, based on the adventures of an idiosyncratic remedial English teacher in a Los Angeles community college who has the facility to see ghosts.

A critical biography and bibliography, Manitou Man, was published in 1999 by the British Fantasy Society.

Graham Masterton was born in Edinburgh in 1946. His grandfather was Thomas Thorne Baker, the eminent scientist who invented DayGlo and was the first man to transmit news photographs by wireless. After training as a newspaper reporter, Graham went on to edit the new British men’s magazine Mayfair, where he encouraged William Burroughs to develop a series of scientific and philosophical articles which eventually became Burroughs’ novel The Wild Boys. At the age of 24, Graham was appointed executive editor of both Penthouse and Penthouse Forum magazines. At this time he started to write a bestselling series of sex ‘how-to’ books including How To Drive Your Man Wild In Bed which has sold over 3 million copies worldwide. His latest, Wild Sex For New Lovers is published by Penguin Putnam in January, 2001. He is a regular contributor to Cosmopolitan, Men’s Health, Woman, Woman’s Own and other mass-market self-improvement magazines.

He lives in Surrey, England (sadly his wife, Wiescka died in April 2011). He has just finished writing a black thriller featuring Ireland’s only female detective superintendent, Katie Maguire, set in the Cork underworld; and a dark fantasy, Jessica’s Angel, about a girl’s search for five supposedly-dead children.

He has written several new short stories and is currently working on a new horror novel, as yet untitled.

About Harry Shannon

Like most authors, I’ve kicked around a lot. I’ve been an actor, a singer, an Emmy-nominated songwriter, a recording artist in Europe, a music publisher, a VP of Carolco Pictures and worked as a free-lance Music Supervisor on films such as ‘Basic Instinct’ and ‘Universal Soldier.’ I’m currently a counselor in private practice.
For the curious, I’ve twice been nominated for the Stoker Award by the Horror Writer’s Association, once for my collection A HOST OF SHADOWS, and for short fiction. I’ve won the Tombstone and the Black Quill once each, and my short story FIFTY MINUTES, co-written with Joe Donnelly, was recently chosen for inclusion in the prestigious anthology Best American Mysteries of 2011. I’m on the list of Major Horror Authors of the Twenty-First Century in Readers’ Advisory Guide to Horror, 2nd Edition, from the American Library Association. You can find me on Facebook or Twitter. I’d love to hear from you.

About Kevin J. Anderson

Kevin J. Anderson has written more than 125 books, including 52 national or international bestsellers. He has over 23 million books in print worldwide in thirty languages. He has been nominated for the Nebula Award, Bram Stoker Award, Shamus Award, and Silver Falchion Award, and has won the SFX Readers’ Choice Award, Golden Duck Award, Scribe Award, and New York Times Notable Book; in 2012 at San Diego Comic Con he received the Faust Grand Master Award for Lifetime Achievement.

He has written numerous bestselling and critically acclaimed novels in the Dune universe with Brian Herbert, as well as Star Wars and X-Files novels. In his original work, he is best known for his Saga of Seven Suns series, the Terra Incognita trilogy, the Dan Shamble, Zombie PI series, and Clockwork Angels: The Novel with Neil Peart. Find out more about Kevin J. Anderson at wordfire.com.

About Tim Waggoner

Tim Waggoner wrote his first story at the age of five, when he created a comic book version of King Kong vs. Godzilla on a stenographer’s pad. It took him a few more years until he began selling professionally, though. Overall, he has published close to thirty novels and three short story collections, and his articles on writing have appeared in Writer’s Digest and Writers’ Journal, among other publications. He teaches creative writing at Sinclair Community College and in Seton Hill University’s Master of Fine Arts in Writing Popular Fiction program. He hopes to continue writing and teaching until he keels over dead, after which he wants to be stuffed and mounted, and then placed in front of his computer terminal.

I have an incurable book addiction and I'm not ashamed to admit it. I will buy a book based on its cover alone. I love promoting authors. I am... the Ultimate Reader.

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